That Was The Week That Was

Lots of Lindbergh here at The Pietist Schoolman, where I considered Charles’ connections to the space program and Anne’s diaries and letters. Over at The Anxious Bench I reported that a recent book on hymnals says as much about the histories of reading and childhood as singing. Elsewhere: • Charles Lindbergh is far from the only famous … More That Was The Week That Was

Ranking America’s Presidents

How should we rank America’s presidents? C-SPAN asked ninety-one “professional observers of the presidency,” including historians Douglas Brinkley, Edward Crapol, Robert Dallek, Annette Gordon-Reed, Allen Guelzo, David Kennedy, and Walter McDougall. Each participant ranked our previous chief executives in ten equally weighted categories. You can find the full results here, but a few highlights: • The top four remained … More Ranking America’s Presidents

Happy Thanksgiving!

I’ve got a new post up today at The Anxious Bench, on the presence of three virtues in Abraham Lincoln’s original 1863 proclamation of a national day of thanksgiving. But that’s all the blogging I plan to do this week. Enjoy your Thanksgiving, and we’ll hope to see you back here next week, when I plan posts on teaching, academic … More Happy Thanksgiving!

6 Things I’ve Learned about Teaching History to 6-Year Olds

Last week our family spent several days in Washington, DC and Pennsylvania, taking the kids to historic sites ranging from the Air & Space Museum to the Gettysburg battlefield. Indeed, one of my favorite things about this fall’s sabbatical is that it lets us continue the historical exploration that we did much of the summer back in Minnesota. … More 6 Things I’ve Learned about Teaching History to 6-Year Olds

What Makes for the Best Historical Movies? (part 2)

Today at The Anxious Bench you’ll find part two of my series on how we might evaluate historical movies like Free State of Jones, which has inspired rave reviews from some historians and criticism from others. If you missed the first part, go back to read what I meant that historical movies and TV series must strive to be both … More What Makes for the Best Historical Movies? (part 2)

Conservatives for Progressives to Read (revisited)

Ah, 2012: when I lamented how civil discourse was being replaced by “ideological segregation,” as the Left and Right engaged in “epistemic closure.” That phrase came from Julian Sanchez, who had observed that, among many conservatives, “Reality is defined by a multimedia array of interconnected and cross promoting conservative blogs, radio programs, magazines, and of course, Fox News. Whatever conflicts with … More Conservatives for Progressives to Read (revisited)

Comment Drive: Why’s the Civil War So Fascinating?

I suspect that I’ve blogged long enough that I’m running out of mildly embarrassing self-revelations, but here’s one oddity I might not have shared: I like to relax by reading about the American Civil War. How European/international historians relax on their spring breaks. pic.twitter.com/JIIUFen4J7 — Chris Gehrz (@cgehrz) March 16, 2015 Yes, while others spend spring break on … More Comment Drive: Why’s the Civil War So Fascinating?

Comment Drive: What’s the Most Historically Accurate Movie?

In the spirit of my fellow historian-blogger John Fea’s annual “spring membership drive,” I’d like to make an intentional effort this week to encourage readers to give back to this blog by sharing their opinions. While I appreciate everyone who reads The Pietist Schoolman, it’s rare for any post to get more than a single comment. Let’s see if … More Comment Drive: What’s the Most Historically Accurate Movie?

The Best of The Pietist Schoolman: The Gettysburg Address

For spring break I’m reading Allen Guelzo’s Civil War history Fateful Lightning, so for today’s visit to the blog archives, I thought I’d dredge up a “This Day in History” post from November 2012 about Abraham Lincoln’s most famous speech. Seven score and nine years ago today, President Abraham Lincoln ascended the dais at the dedication of … More The Best of The Pietist Schoolman: The Gettysburg Address