That Was The Week That Was

Lots of Lindbergh here at The Pietist Schoolman, where I considered Charles’ connections to the space program and Anne’s diaries and letters. Over at The Anxious Bench I reported that a recent book on hymnals says as much about the histories of reading and childhood as singing. Elsewhere: • Charles Lindbergh is far from the only famous … More That Was The Week That Was

“An Honest Witness”: The Diaries of Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Back in the fall of 2016, while my family was on sabbatical in Virginia, an editor’s suggestion that I write a religious biography of Charles Lindbergh made him the unnamed center of a three-part series on biography that I wrote for The Anxious Bench. If I did write such a book about Lindbergh, I mused … More “An Honest Witness”: The Diaries of Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Lindbergh and the Space Race

One reason my blogging here has been rather hit-or-miss lately is that I’ve been busy researching my “spiritual, but not religious” biography of Charles A. Lindbergh. I didn’t repeat last summer’s productive East Coast swing through Lindbergh papers at Yale University and the Library of Congress, but I have been reading a wide variety of … More Lindbergh and the Space Race

That Was The Week That Was

Apart from an Anxious Bench post on the new Christians Against Christian Nationalism statement, I took the week off from blogging to finish moving into my new office and to read through several years’ worth of Anne Morrow Lindbergh’s diaries and letters. Elsewhere: • If you can see any shades of gray on the debate over abortion, you’ll want … More That Was The Week That Was

That Was The Week That Was

Here at Pietist Schoolman I wrote about the military history of childhood and the religious history of my own adolescence. Over at The Anxious Bench, I considered the proposition that Instagram food photos are the 21st century version of table grace, and shared a small digital humanities project. Elsewhere… • Also at Anxious Bench, Andrea Turpin considered … More That Was The Week That Was

On Not Growing Up in Evangelical Youth Culture

I never thought that Slate would become a must-read for insightful reporting and commentary on evangelicalism, but after Ruth Graham’s fine work earlier this month on a controversial book about heaven, last week brought Laura Turner’s remarkable memoir of coming of age at Willow Creek, the Chicago area megachurch where her parents (John and Nancy Ortberg) … More On Not Growing Up in Evangelical Youth Culture