“Pietism is the way the pastor does things”: Glen Wiberg (1925-2017)

“The [Pietistic] tradition still lives,” theologian John Weborg once reassured his friend, Glen Wiberg. “But to new people the word Pietism is an unknown word. Pietism is the way the pastor does things.” So while I appreciate having the chance to write a book on Pietism with my pastor, I wish that anyone interested in Pietism could just spend … More “Pietism is the way the pastor does things”: Glen Wiberg (1925-2017)

Confessing Faculty: Why I Signed (and Why I Hesitated)

It’s probably getting harder to believe my earlier claim that I rarely sign petitions, now that I’ve gone ahead and done so three times since last February. But please believe me that I don’t add my name lightly to documents like this “Statement of Confession and Commitment,” signed by a growing group of “Confessing Faculty” and inspired by … More Confessing Faculty: Why I Signed (and Why I Hesitated)

That Was The Week That Was

Here… • My article on Christians and National Socialism can be found in the newest issue of Christian History Magazine. • Nothing Rhymes with Gehrz, my newest podcast collaboration with Sam Mulberry, debuted. • Why interfaith engagement is a civic imperative in a religiously diverse society. • Two posts on World War I: one on the challenges involved in … More That Was The Week That Was

From Bubble to Bridge: Interfaith Engagement as a Civic Imperative

Why is it imperative that Christians move beyond their “bubbles” and engage with their neighbors of other religions? In the first two chapters of From Bubble to Bridge, my Bethel colleagues Marion Larson and Sara Shady argue that interfaith engagement is both a civic and religious imperative. We’ll continue our series with the first. A Civic Imperative (ch. 1) Many … More From Bubble to Bridge: Interfaith Engagement as a Civic Imperative

When Did the Western Front Become “The Western Front”?

The charms of Twitter wear thin quickly, but here’s one good use for that medium: asking your friendly neighborhood historian about one of their favorite topics. @cgehrz did the British use the term "Western Front" for the Western Front during #WW1 or did that develop later? — Joshua House (@wanderingyankee) March 2, 2017 Great question, … More When Did the Western Front Become “The Western Front”?

Christians, National Socialism, and the World Wars

I’d be thrilled to have any chance to write for Christian History Magazine, a venerable publication that has been teaching ordinary Christians about their history since 1982. But I’m especially honored that I got to contribute an article on Christians and National Socialism to an issue dedicated to one of my favorite topics: the Christian experience of … More Christians, National Socialism, and the World Wars

How Would Donald Trump Fill Out His Bracket?

To the countless number of ways in which our current president is unlike his immediate predecessor, you can add this: Donald Trump is not filling out a March Madness bracket for ESPN. Of course, that short-lived presidential tradition had been so appealing because, as ESPN analyst Andy Katz explained, “President Obama follows basketball and is passionate about the sport. He … More How Would Donald Trump Fill Out His Bracket?

My New Podcast: “Nothing Rhymes with Gehrz”

What do the following words have in common? Crusader, optics, process, unity, upset, wondering 1. They don’t rhyme with Gehrz. But then, it seems that nothing (in English) does. 2. They’re discussed by Sam Mulberry and myself on the pilot episode of Nothing Rhymes with Gehrz, our latest venture in the world of podcasting. (Last year, Sam joined … More My New Podcast: “Nothing Rhymes with Gehrz”