What Is Truth? The Return of “Nothing Rhymes with Gehrz”

If you’re a hardcore reader of The Pietist Schoolman and a family member and prone to spending too much time online, you might know that last spring my colleague Sam Mulberry and I premiered our latest podcast, Nothing Rhymes with Gehrz. Over the course of two gloriously unrehearsed episodes, we each suggested six words that (a) did not rhyme … More What Is Truth? The Return of “Nothing Rhymes with Gehrz”

Is Loyalty a Virtue?

I like to think of myself as a pretty loyal person. I’m wary of loyalty to imagined communities like nations, but when it comes to family members and close friends, I’d even say that I’m fiercely loyal. But one of the many consequences of the Trump presidency is that I’ve been reconsidering the moral status … More Is Loyalty a Virtue?

How Christian Scholars Seek Truth in a “Post-Truth” World

Fake news. Alternative facts. Post-truth. When those are the catch phrases of the moment, this portion of my employer’s statement of core values can seem both quaint and urgently needed: As learners, we are critical thinkers and problem-solvers committed to academic excellence and intellectual rigor. At the same time, we are truth-seekers, recognizing that all truth-scientific, artistic, philosophical, … More How Christian Scholars Seek Truth in a “Post-Truth” World

Confessing Faculty: Why I Signed (and Why I Hesitated)

It’s probably getting harder to believe my earlier claim that I rarely sign petitions, now that I’ve gone ahead and done so three times since last February. But please believe me that I don’t add my name lightly to documents like this “Statement of Confession and Commitment,” signed by a growing group of “Confessing Faculty” and inspired by … More Confessing Faculty: Why I Signed (and Why I Hesitated)

What Makes for the Best Historical Movies? (part 1)

I’m not planning to blog this week, while I join my family on vacation on Minnesota’s beautiful North Shore. But over at The Anxious Bench, my regular Tuesday post kicked off a new series on historical movies like this summer’s Civil War/Reconstruction epic, Free State of Jones. At the end of the series, I’ll reveal two of … More What Makes for the Best Historical Movies? (part 1)

A Week of Listening: Makoto Fujimura on Hope, Beauty, and Justice

Today let me invite readers to listen to a different kind of voice. While the artist Makoto Fujimura was speaking the night before the grand jury decision and subsequent protests in Ferguson, his reflection on faith, beauty, truth, and — above all — hope couldn’t have been more timely in light of what was happening in Missouri. Invited to … More A Week of Listening: Makoto Fujimura on Hope, Beauty, and Justice

Best of The Pietist Schoolman: A Pietist Model of Christian Scholarship

It’s going to be an unusually busy summer week for this college professor, so in place of new posts, enjoy a few of my favorites from the first half of 2014. We’ll start with my attempt to sketch a Pietist alternative to the scholarly model known as “faith-learning integration” — a three-part series that represented … More Best of The Pietist Schoolman: A Pietist Model of Christian Scholarship

A Pietist Model of Christian Scholarship: Against Faith-Learning Integration

What would Christian scholarship look like if rooted in the Pietist tradition? Would Pietists affirm something like “the integration of faith and learning”? Yesterday I had the chance to talk about these questions as part of Bethel’s annual faith-learning workshop for faculty on the cusp of applying for tenure. Thanks to workshop facilitator Kathy Nevins for the invitation! (Kathy … More A Pietist Model of Christian Scholarship: Against Faith-Learning Integration