How’s Lindbergh Doing?

I took a weekend off from sharing my usual That Was The Week That Was collection of links, but I had a good reason: I wrote seventeen pages of my Lindbergh project! That chapter wrapped up this afternoon, so now feels like a good time to share an update on my progress. If you’re new to the … More How’s Lindbergh Doing?

That Was The Week That Was

This week I considered a recent survey showing that more and more non-evangelicals are embracing the language of being “born again.” Elsewhere: • I’m excited that Bethel will host John Inazu next month. Hopefully he’ll revisit some of the themes from his most recent piece for Christianity Today, on the need for white evangelicals to … More That Was The Week That Was

That Was The Week That Was

I considered a Twitter controversy about plants, the notion of “comfort colleges,” and the impact of the First World War on Native American identity. Elsewhere: • “America is at an awkward age,” began Elizabeth Stice’s thoughtful essay on history and heritage. “We are old enough to be embarrassed by our parents, but not mature enough … More That Was The Week That Was

That Was The Week That Was

Here at Pietist Schoolman I wrote about the military history of childhood and the religious history of my own adolescence. Over at The Anxious Bench, I considered the proposition that Instagram food photos are the 21st century version of table grace, and shared a small digital humanities project. Elsewhere… • Also at Anxious Bench, Andrea Turpin considered … More That Was The Week That Was

That Was The Week That Was

Before spending most of the week enjoying a holiday trip with family, I reflected on the recent annual meeting of my home denomination, explained what’s been called the “honest patriotism” of abolitionist Frederick Douglass, and shared some reflections from my parents and two others who joined us last month on our World Wars in Western … More That Was The Week That Was

That Was The Week That Was

I considered the similarities between professional hockey and evangelical Christianity, and encouraged my home denomination to cling to its distinctive heritage in Pietism. Elsewhere: • U.S. historians are debating a new article alleging sexual misconduct by Martin Luther King, Jr., on the basis of documents from the FBI agents who spied on him. • One … More That Was The Week That Was

How Many Americans Are “Spiritual, But Not Religious”?

I’ve described my current research project as a “spiritual, but not religious” biography of Charles Lindbergh. A non-churchgoer who never identified with any particular religion, the famous aviator nonetheless read religious texts, lost much of his early faith in science and technology, and grew increasingly interested in matters spiritual and supernatural. In part, what drew … More How Many Americans Are “Spiritual, But Not Religious”?