Why We Can Remember the Holocaust

“[T]he most distinctive feature of history as an academic discipline,” I once argued, “is the relative paucity of the sources available. All we’ve got to go on are whatever artifacts survive the passing of time, and most of those sources erode. Past supporting preservation and archival efforts (including oral history projects), there’s not much historians can do … More Why We Can Remember the Holocaust

Thursday’s Podcast: Magisterial and Radical Reformations

Back from a break for our penultimate episode of season 3, Sam and I surveyed a variety of Protestant Reformations, both magisterial (Calvin’s Geneva, the Church of England) and radical (Anabaptists in particular). Featured Books Diarmaid MacCulloch, The Reformation: A History and All Things Made New: The Reformation and Its Legacy Other Readings John Calvin, Golden Booklet of the … More Thursday’s Podcast: Magisterial and Radical Reformations

The Reformations, 1517-1546

To mark the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s 95 Theses, I spent the better part of today tweeting quotations, images, and links from the Reformation — covering each year from 1517 until Luther’s death in 1546. Luther and the German Reformation was my focus, but I also touched on the Swiss Reformation, the Radical Reformation, … More The Reformations, 1517-1546

The Lecture Lives. I Would Know — I’m a Professor.

Okay, let’s try this again: the college lecture is neither obsolete nor fool-proof. Like anything, it can be done badly, but rightly understood, it’s still a highly important mode of teaching. Two reasons I’m thinking about a topic I’ve addressed several times before: First, Wired just offered another of its biennial critiques of the lecture. Entitled “The Traditional … More The Lecture Lives. I Would Know — I’m a Professor.

Thinking about the American Present via the European Past

It’s been about three weeks since last I blogged here at The Pietist Schoolman. Anything been happening? If you didn’t know, I spent most of January in Britain, Belgium, France, and Germany, where my friend Sam Mulberry and I were leading a travel course on the history of World War I. I’m sure I’ll have more to share … More Thinking about the American Present via the European Past