That Was The Week That Was

This week I somehow connected country music to the history of violence against women preachers, talked with author Angela Denker about faith, football, and politics in the Age of Trump, and probed my emotional response to my favorite baseball team winning a division title. (By the way, if you’ve been enjoying the new season of our … More That Was The Week That Was

Wednesday’s Podcast: The Mount Rushmore of Baseball History

When better to focus on America’s National Pastime than the day that Minnesota shatters its February record for snowfall? Yes, it’s our spring training episode of The 252! • Chris Moore suggested some ways that baseball is both shaped by politics and helps us to think about politics. • Then we discussed who belongs on … More Wednesday’s Podcast: The Mount Rushmore of Baseball History

When There’s Too Much Historical Evidence

Over the weekend I continued my Anxious Bench series on the challenges of writing biographies by reflecting on the problem of historical evidence. While the biographer whose book I’m currently reading seems to have enough evidence to narrate his subject’s entire life on a weekly (sometimes daily or even hourly) basis, I know that he actually is deploying … More When There’s Too Much Historical Evidence

Amish Grace and the Anabaptist Way

Ten years ago yesterday, a man named Charles Carl Roberts IV shot ten students in a school near Nickel Mines, Pennsylvania, then committed suicide. Five children died; five eventually recovered. Sadly, episodes like this have become almost familiar in American society, but this mass murder was unique. Not only did it take place at a one-room Amish schoolhouse in rural … More Amish Grace and the Anabaptist Way

Back to Basics: What It Is Christian Historians Do

Over the last three weeks, I’ve spent a lot of time talking with undergraduates about what it is that Christian historians do — and how, if at all, it’s different from what non-Christian historians do. • To help my Intro to History students prepare to write a preliminary statement of what they think it means to “think … More Back to Basics: What It Is Christian Historians Do

Roger Olson on Pietism and Postmodernism

For once, it was easy this week to know where to start my post-vacation ritual of sifting through stacks of new publications requiring some reading attention: with Roger Olson’s article in the Summer 2012 issue of Christian Scholar’s Review, “Pietism and Postmodernism: Points of Congeniality.” A refined version of the second of two lectures he … More Roger Olson on Pietism and Postmodernism

What Pietism Is Good For

This actually came out a week before this blog started, so I didn’t include it in my links wrap-up yesterday, but check out this brief essay from Matt Jenson recommending Michelle Clifton-Soderstrom’s short book, Angels, Worms, and Bogeys: The Christian Ethic of Pietism. Agreeing with Clifton-Soderstrom that (Hallensian) Pietists were not world-denying moralizers, Jenson concludes, … More What Pietism Is Good For