That Was The Week That Was

I interviewed a former Pro Bowler, considered what’s being lost with the decline of mainline Protestantism, and explained why this blog is going to be relatively (but not completely) quiet for most of 2020. Elsewhere: • A local newspaper here in St. Paul reported that a local Methodist church was banning older people. Not surprisingly, … More That Was The Week That Was

That Was The Week That Was

Here… • Five of my Bethel colleagues joined dozens of other Christian theologians to issue a modern-day version of the Barmen Declaration. Dean Pamela Lightsey and Dr @ccollinswinn draft the #BostonDeclaration at Boston University School of Theology #aarsbl17 pic.twitter.com/ZdnNuujexD — Peter Heltzel (@PeterHeltzel) November 18, 2017 • How prayer sustained two of the most famous … More That Was The Week That Was

Thursday’s Podcast: Magisterial and Radical Reformations

Back from a break for our penultimate episode of season 3, Sam and I surveyed a variety of Protestant Reformations, both magisterial (Calvin’s Geneva, the Church of England) and radical (Anabaptists in particular). Featured Books Diarmaid MacCulloch, The Reformation: A History and All Things Made New: The Reformation and Its Legacy Other Readings John Calvin, Golden Booklet of the … More Thursday’s Podcast: Magisterial and Radical Reformations

That Was The Week That Was

Here… • I’m mostly past worrying about pageviews, but if you missed my observations about the past and politics in southwestern Virginia… I do think it deserves more attention than it got. • But more importantly, Andy Crouch’s Trump editorial in Christianity Today got a huge readership. • Reader Sean O’Neil suggested that Christian intellectuals are actually planting some important seeds during … More That Was The Week That Was

Amish Grace and the Anabaptist Way

Ten years ago yesterday, a man named Charles Carl Roberts IV shot ten students in a school near Nickel Mines, Pennsylvania, then committed suicide. Five children died; five eventually recovered. Sadly, episodes like this have become almost familiar in American society, but this mass murder was unique. Not only did it take place at a one-room Amish schoolhouse in rural … More Amish Grace and the Anabaptist Way

The Anabaptist Vision

Now that our series on teaching the history of World War I in Europe (“Over There”) is well underway, I’m starting a new (though somewhat less frequently updated) series stemming from my research into Pietism and higher education, in which we consider some significant (neo)Anabaptist critiques of Pietism. Growing up in suburban evangelical churches, I … More The Anabaptist Vision