The Impostor: Why I Wrote a Biography of Charles Lindbergh

Advance and preordered copies of the book have been circulating for a few weeks now, but tomorrow is still a big day for me: the official release of my spiritual biography of Charles Lindbergh. Five years after I first started toying with that idea, it’s beyond exciting to see the book come widely available. I’ve … More The Impostor: Why I Wrote a Biography of Charles Lindbergh

That Was The Week That Was

This week I explained the dedication to my new book, introduced a new seminar I’m teaching in the fall, and explored a religious consequence of America entering WWI. Elsewhere: • Either to read right now, or to save for the 20th anniversary of 9/11: this wonderfully reported long-form piece on that tragedy’s effects on one family … More That Was The Week That Was

Why I Dedicated a Charles Lindbergh Biography to Dick Peterson

Last week I shared the acknowledgments section from my biography of Charles Lindbergh. Today, a few words about the dedication: In honor of another descendant of Swedish immigrants:Dick Peterson—for whom physics is an act of worship,whose career confirms Anne Lindbergh’s instinct that“the true scientist [is] akin to the artist and the saint,”whose life demonstrates that … More Why I Dedicated a Charles Lindbergh Biography to Dick Peterson

Introducing… Applied Humanities Seminar

I’m not sure exactly what it will look like given Minnesota’s current COVID numbers, but three weeks from today begins the 2021-22 academic year at Bethel University. This fall I’m teaching two courses I’ve taught many times before — our first-year GES130 Christianity and Western Culture survey and my third-year course HIS354 Modern Europe — and … More Introducing… Applied Humanities Seminar

That Was The Week That Was

This week I shared the acknowledgments from my biography of Charles Lindbergh, answered five questions from my publisher, and reflected on the cooperative nature of Olympic competition. Elsewhere: • “We are being punished for our sins against the environment, against one another, and against God,” wrote Mark Schwehn, thinking of COVID in light of older ways of interpreting … More That Was The Week That Was

That Was The Week That Was

This week I asked how Pietists follow Jesus and celebrated the life of theologian Clarence Bass. Elsewhere: • The formal release date isn’t until mid-August, but copies of my Charles Lindbergh biography are starting to be delivered… • “Religion still matters to many modern Olympic athletes,” wrote Kelsey Dallas, “but its influence on the Games is harder … More That Was The Week That Was