That Was The Week That Was

This week I curated some advice from fellow historians about how parents can help their home-bound kids learn history, reflected on the 75th anniversary of V-E Day, and recorded podcasts about sports journalism and the psychology of pandemics. Elsewhere: • I haven’t formally announced it until now, but I don’t think it will surprise anyone … More That Was The Week That Was

That Was The Week That Was

This links wrap is a few hours later than usual because I spent the morning in Minneapolis celebrating the graduation of my brother Jon, who earned his doctorate in education. Congratulations, Dr. Gehrz! And I have no Pietist Schoolman posts to remind you of, since I was busy getting ready for the start of classes next week … More That Was The Week That Was

Best of The Pietist Schoolman: A Brief History of Patriotism in American Hymnals

Now that we’re into the academic year and I’m both busier and readership is up, I thought I’d ease into the week by reposting a couple of pieces that you might have missed during the warmer months. I’ll start with a three-part series from July. Which patriotic hymns are most popular? Have they changed over … More Best of The Pietist Schoolman: A Brief History of Patriotism in American Hymnals

“Of thee I sing”: A Brief History of Patriotism in American Hymnals (part 3)

By far the most popular American patriotic hymn is Samuel Francis Smith’s “America,” appearing in over 1600 of the hymnals indexed at Hymnary.org — nearly four times as many as Katharine Lee Bates’ “America the Beautiful” and Julia Ward Howe’s “Battle Hymn of the Republic,” five times more than Francis Scott Key’s “Star-Spangled Banner.” And … More “Of thee I sing”: A Brief History of Patriotism in American Hymnals (part 3)