That Was The Week That Was

All I did here was to promote some upcoming speaking engagements and to invite people to sign up to receive a free e-copy of our forthcoming Lenten devotional. (At The Anxious Bench, I considered Ulysses Grant’s position as America’s first Methodist president.) I’ll try to get back to Pietist Schoolman blogging next week; until then, here’s some of what … More That Was The Week That Was

That Was The Week That Was

Here… • My favorite Anxious Bench post so far: a historical and personal reflection on Warner Sallman’s painting Head of Christ. (Though, not surprisingly, writing a post questioning a depiction of Jesus as white brought out the worst in Patheos commenters…) • Another fellow Covenanter, my co-author Mark Pattie, shared a sneak peek at his chapter on the Bible … More That Was The Week That Was

#MethodistHillary

Some levity for your evening: from many of the same summer-breaking scholars of religion who brought you #IfTrumpwereEvangelical, it’s #MethodistHillary! In the spirit of #iftrumpwereevangelical comes super #MethodistHillary. She wants your vote but also that casserole recipe. — Kate Bowler (@KatecBowler) June 28, 2016 N/sure #MethodistHillary can be as yuge as #iftrumpwereevangelical… or wants to be … More #MethodistHillary

That Was The Week That Was

Here… • We finished season 2 of The Pietist Schoolman Podcast with a listener feedback session that revisited the theme of Christian unity and asked after the political inclinations of Pietists. • Meanwhile, it was four posts in four days on Christian higher education: quantifying the state of the humanities in evangelical colleges; what that says about evangelicalism; rethinking … More That Was The Week That Was

Church-Affiliated Higher Ed in the Methodist Tradition (Aaron Morrison)

Earlier this month I posted a response to the president of Oklahoma Wesleyan University. Today we move north a couple states to hear from someone affiliated with Nebraska Wesleyan University: guest-blogger Aaron Morrison reflects on the broad spectrum of Methodist and Wesleyan higher education. As an undergraduate student visiting with friends and family over semester breaks, I would occasionally be … More Church-Affiliated Higher Ed in the Methodist Tradition (Aaron Morrison)

Pietism as Instincts, or It’s More Than Old Churches in Rural Iowa

At the end of June I had the chance to spend a few days at Rathbun Lake in southern Iowa, joining my wife’s extended family for a reunion. Of course, even on vacation I couldn’t escape my research. In a part of Iowa most famous in religious history for being part of the Mormon Trail, I turned … More Pietism as Instincts, or It’s More Than Old Churches in Rural Iowa

Who Are the Most Significant Americans in History? (part 2)

In part one of their response to Smithsonian Magazine’s attempt to list “The 100 Most Significant American of All Time,” historians Miles Mullin, John Fea, Devin Manzullo-Thomas, and Jonathan Den Hartog evaluated the methodology of the project. Today, they pick apart the actual list itself… Which name were you most pleasantly surprised to see? (i.e., someone who might not … More Who Are the Most Significant Americans in History? (part 2)

Social Class at Christian Colleges (part 2)

Does socioeconomic class, with vastly less fanfare than gender or race, present equally significant problems for learning communities centered on a Savior in whom there is no difference of class, gender, or race? As I wrote at the end of yesterday’s post, I was spurred to reflect on this by a Chronicle of Higher Education … More Social Class at Christian Colleges (part 2)