That Was The Week That Was

In spare moments between grading, I passed along the story of Bethel’s soon-to-be first Digital Humanities graduate and took note of a proposed culture war compromise involving evangelical colleges. Then over at The Anxious Bench, I suggested that no historian writes about the past “as it actually happened” without imagining the past as they think … More That Was The Week That Was

That Was The Week That Was

While I was starting a new podcast season and sharing some final thoughts on the affordability and sustainability of Christian liberal arts colleges, here’s what some other writers had to say: • A Reformation Day question from Jay Phelan: what does it mean to be Protestant? • If an annual listen to “The Reformation Polka” … More That Was The Week That Was

A New Song (Psalm 96)

Thanks to Brad Bergfalk, pastor of First Congregational Church in Litchfield, Connecticut, for inviting me to preach yesterday. It’s always a pleasure to preach in other churches, but especially in one as historic as FCC Litchfield. That congregation was organized in 1721, and the current building dates to 1829. My favorite radio station is called … More A New Song (Psalm 96)

That Was The Week That Was

Here… • I wrestled with how and why Christians should pray for a political leader like Donald Trump. • My travels out east took me through Bethlehem, Pennsylvania — home of one of the most significant Moravian communities in history. • And if you’re interested in seeing other historic sites on your travels this summer, … More That Was The Week That Was

That Was The Week That Was

While I was busy passing the plate and celebrating a miraculous Vikings win, others were writing about Christianity, history, education, and other things I find interesting: • I’m not sure I’ve ever willingly read a book by a current, former, or would-be U.S. president. That might change. • I missed this last week: the most … More That Was The Week That Was

“By the Rivers of Babylon”: Thoughts on Exile for the 4th of July

Invited to Rochester, New York to speak in July 1852, the abolitionist Frederick Douglass asked if his listeners meant ” to mock me, by asking me to speak to-day?” After all, he said, “This Fourth [of] July is yours, not mine. You may rejoice, I must mourn.” Being asked to celebrate a slaveholding country as a former slave brought to his … More “By the Rivers of Babylon”: Thoughts on Exile for the 4th of July